Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Vieux Telegraphe’

2004 Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Bottle Notes

Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the Rhone Valley, was founded in 1898 by Hippolyte Brunier. Located on the highest terrace of the appellation, the domaine was named for an 18th century telegraph relay tower located nearby. Today the 173-acre domaine is run by Daniel and Frederic Brunier, the great grandsons of the founder. Vieux Télégraphe is one of the appellation’s most admired estates. The vineyards are planted to 65% Grenache, 15% Syrah, 15% Mourvedre and 5% Cinsault and other grapes.

Light crimson in color with some bricking at the edge of the glass. 14.5% ABV. The nose is scintillating with aromas of red fruit, leather, garrigue and herbes de Provence. Medium body with perfect acidity. Rustic, old school CdP. Concentrated and powerful. Kirsch, tea, dried cherries and white pepper on the palate. The finish is exceptionally long with substantial tannins. Super Chateauneuf-du-Pape from an overlooked vintage. Drink over the next 2-4 years.

My rating: 94 points.

I previously wrote about Vieux Télégraphe in 2010 Châteauneuf-du-Pape: My Recommendations. Recent vintages of this wine can generally be had found for $60-$75. Hard to wrong here.

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

Pick My Next Bottle – 2005 Châteauneuf-du-Pape

The June Installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on 2005 Châteauneuf-du-Pape. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. The winning bottle will be opened this Saturday and a Bottle Note will be published the following week.

2005 was an exceptional vintage in Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Conditions were perfect and the vintage rivals other greats of the last 30 years including 1990 and 1998.

The Contenders:

  • 2005 Clos Saint-Jean La Combe de Fous – One of the candidates for the wine of the vintage is the extraordinary 2005 Chateauneuf du Pape La Combe des Fous (same blend and elevage). Probably the best cuvee of this wine yet made, the wine has a saturated purple color to the rim as well as an extraordinary nose of blackberry, blueberry, black truffle, incense, lavender, and a hint of graphite. The wine is remarkably concentrated, spectacularly pure, full-bodied, with amazing length of well over a minute. This wine is a ‘wow, wow’ sort of wine, a profoundly great Chateauneuf du Pape. Anticipated maturity: 2012-2025. 98 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 2005 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe – One of the most age-worthy cuvees in the appellation, Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe’s 2005 Châteauneuf du Pape was gorgeous on this occasion, showing classic iodine, seaweed and peppery herbs intermixed with layers of sweet currant, plum and blackberry fruits. Full-bodied, powerful and ripe, with a still youthful profile, this beauty won’t hit full maturity for another 3-4 years, and should hold for a decade or more after that. 95 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 2005 Domaine du Pégaü Cuvée Réservée– The 2005 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee Reservee (normally a blend of approximately 80% Grenache and the rest Syrah and Mourvedre) exhibits a deep ruby/plum/garnet hue along with lots of grilled meat juices, roasted Provencal herbs, tar, blackberries and black currants. The wine is medium to full-bodied, still firm and tannic. It is those tannins that make the 2005 somewhat reminiscent of a tight, more austere-styled vintage such as 1995. The 2005 needs at least another 4-5 years of cellaring, and should last for 20 years or more. 92 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which 2005 Châteauneuf-du-Pape Should I Open?

  • 2005 Domaine du Pégaü "Cuvée Réservée (41%, 17 Votes)
  • 2005 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe (37%, 15 Votes)
  • 2005 Clos Saint-Jean La Combe de Fous (22%, 9 Votes)

Total Voters: 41

Loading ... Loading ...

Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the July installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

2000 Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Bottle Notes

Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the Rhone Valley, was founded in 1898 by Hippolyte Brunier. Located on the highest terrace of the appellation, the domaine was named for an 18th century telegraph relay tower located nearby. Today the 173-acre domaine is run by Daniel and Frederic Brunier, the great grandsons of the founder. Vieux Télégraphe is one of the appellation’s most admired estates. The vineyards are planted to 65% Grenache, 15% Syrah, 15% Mourvedre and 5% Cinsault and other grapes.

Garnet in color. 14% ABV. Gorgeous nose of red fruits, garrigue, white pepper and seaweed. Medium body with medium to strong acidity. Big and bold with noticeable tannins. Cherries, kirsch, minerals and iron on the palate. The finish is long and somewhat tannic. Classically structured Chateauneuf from a traditional producer. I’d be inclined to drink over the next several years while there is enough fruit to balance out the tannins.

My rating: 92 points.

I previously wrote about Vieux Télégraphe in 2010 Châteauneuf-du-Pape: My Recommendations. The ’12 version of this wine is spectacular and still available at retail for about $60 per bottle. Happy hunting!

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

1998 Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Bottle Notes

The 1998 Vieux Télégraphe was the winning bottle in the November Installment of Pick My Next Bottle. The bottle was not decanted and was served with Thanksgiving Dinner.

Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the Rhone Valley, was founded in 1898 by Hippolyte Brunier. Located on the highest terrace of the appellation, the domaine was named for an 18th century telegraph relay tower located nearby. Today the 173-acre domaine is run by Daniel and Frederic Brunier, the great grandsons of the founder. Vieux Télégraphe is one of the appellation’s most admired estates. The vineyards are planted to 65% Grenache, 15% Syrah, 15% Mourvedre and 5% Cinsault and other grapes.

Light red in color. Almost translucent. 14% ABV. Restrained nose of red fruits, kirsch, iron and herbes de Provence. Medium body with plenty of acidity. Precise and complex with pure, sweet fruit. Dried cherries, garrigue, iron and game on the palate. The wine picks up weight and becomes more intense with time in the glass. The finish is exceptionally long. Aging beautifully. Well stored bottles will drink well for another 2-4 years.

My rating: 94 points.

I previously wrote about Vieux Télégraphe in 2010 Châteauneuf-du-Pape: My Recommendations. The ’12 version of this wine is spectacular and still available at retail for about $60 per bottle. Happy hunting!

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

Pick My Next Bottle – A Wine for Thanksgiving

The November installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on some special bottles that might grace the table at Zinfandel Chronicles Headquarters this Thanksgiving. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. I plan on opening the winning bottle on Thanksgiving and will publish a Bottle Note shortly thereafter.

As it pertains to vintages, 1998 for Châteauneuf-du-Pape, 1997 for Napa Valley and 1990 for Bordeaux, are without question some of the all time greats.

The contenders:

  • 1998 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe “La Crau” Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Between 1978 and 2007, this 1998 is the greatest Vieux Telegraphe that was produced. It has taken a good decade for this wine to shed its tannins and come out of a dormant, closed period. It has finally emerged, and notes of iodine, seaweed, black currants, incense, and sweet cherries as well as hot rocks jump from the glass of this full-bodied, powerful wine. It possesses considerable elegance and purity, along with loads of raspberries and incense, in a round, juicy, rich style that is just emerging from the closet. The wine is still youthful and a pre-adolescent in terms of its ultimate evolution. Approachable now, it will continue to evolve for another 15-20 years. Bravo! 95 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 1997 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red – The finest Proprietary Red produced by Pahlmeyer to date is their 1997… A super-rich, blockbuster effort, it exhibits an opaque purple color in addition to a fabulous bouquet of black fruits, espresso, cocoa, mocha, and flowers. A prodigious red, with low acidity, spectacular concentration, and fabulous purity as well as overall symmetry, it can be drunk now, but promises to last for 20-25 years. 98 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 1990 Leoville Barton – Believe it or not, the 1990 Leoville Barton can actually be drunk – something that cannot be said about the broodingly backward, still excruciatingly tannic 1982. The exceptionally concentrated 1990 reveals more polished, sweeter tannins along with a big, sweet kiss of black currant, forest floor, cedar, and spice box notes. While it still has some tannins to shed, this full-bodied, powerful, long wine is approachable. It should continue to evolve for another two decades. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which Bottle Should I open for Thanksgiving

  • 1998 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe (42%, 23 Votes)
  • 1997 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red (35%, 19 Votes)
  • 1990 Leoville Barton (23%, 13 Votes)

Total Voters: 55

Loading ... Loading ...

Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the December installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

Pick My Next Bottle – The 2000 Vintage

The July Installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on wines from the 2000 vintage. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. The winning bottle will be opened this Sunday and a Bottle Note will be published shortly thereafter.

My wife and I were married in July of 2000. With that in mind I stocked the cellar with enough wines from the vintage so that we would always have something to drink at an anniversary dinner. Knowing we will be eating Italian food this Sunday I have excluded Bordeaux from the list below. That being said I think most classified growth Bordeaux from this vintage could use more time in the cellar.

The Contenders:

2000 Argiano Solengo – There is no doubting the phenomenal quality of the 2000 Solengo, a blend of equal parts Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah with a tiny dollop of Petit Verdot included in the blend. Its opaque ruby/purple color is followed by a stunning perfume of creme de cassis, blackberries, espresso, licorice, and new saddle leather. Full-bodied, sensationally concentrated, pure, and well-textured, with a 45-second finish, this unformed, youthful black beauty possesses extraordinary upside potential. Anticipated maturity: 2008-2022. 95 points from the Wine Advocate.

2000 Domaine du Vieux Telegraphe “La Crau” Châteauneuf-du-Pape – The elegant 2000 Vieux Telegraphe La Crau possesses 14.8% alcohol, along with a deep ruby/purple color, charming, rich, fruitiness, and firm tannin in the finish. With loads of freshness, copious quantities of pepper, seaweed, and black fruit characteristics, and a distinctive minerality, this full-bodied, sweet 2000 requires 2-3 years of cellaring; it should age well for 15-16 years. Anticipated maturity: 2005-2018. 91 points from the Wine Advocate.

2000 Marcarini Barolo La Serra – The 2000 Barolo La Serra has aged gracefully. Crushed flowers, tobacco, cedar, licorice and leather are some of the notes that emerge from this pretty Barolo. Layers of sweet, perfumed fruit linger on the beguiling finish. The firm La Serra tannins are always present, yet this remains a highly attractive wine that should continue to drink well for a number of years. Anticipated maturity: 2011-2018. 92 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which Wine from the 2000 Vintage Should I Open?

  • 2000 Argiano Solengo (50%, 18 Votes)
  • 2000 Vieux Telegraphe (25%, 9 Votes)
  • 2000 Marcarini La Serra (25%, 9 Votes)

Total Voters: 36

Loading ... Loading ...

Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, please do let me know if you have any suggestions for the August installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

1995 Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Bottle Notes

Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the Rhone Valley, was founded in 1898 by Hippolyte Brunier. Located on the highest terrace of the appellation, the domaine was named for an 18th century telegraph relay tower located nearby. Today the 173-acre domaine is run by Daniel and Frederic Brunier, the great grandsons of the founder. Vieux Télégraphe is one of the appellation’s most admired estates. The vineyards are planted to 65% Grenache, 15% Syrah, 15% Mourvedre and 5% Cinsault and other grapes.

Garnet in color. 14% ABV. Spectacular nose of iron, iodine, Herbes de Provence and dried cherries. On the palate the fruit is starting to fade ever so slightly but the wine has a sense of finesse and elegance. Flavors of cherries, cinnamon, iron and plums. The finish just lingers and begs you to reach for another sip. Gorgeous, traditional CDP that is ready to drink.

My rating: 93 points.

I previously wrote about Vieux Télégraphe in 2010 Châteauneuf-du-Pape: My Recommendations. The ’12 version of this wine is spectacular and still available at retail for about $60 per bottle. Happy hunting!

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

Pick My Next Bottle – 2001 Châteauneuf-du-Pape

The July Installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on 2001 Châteauneuf-du-Pape. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. Voting will close this Saturday and the winning bottle will be opened this Sunday. A Bottle Note will be published shortly thereafter.

The last in a run of four good vintages in the Rhône, 2001 in Châteauneuf-du-Pape produced some great wines with balance and length. The key features of the year were low yields, a hot, dry summer and ideal harvest conditions. 2001 compares favorably with the top vintages of the last 15 years including 1998 and 2005.

The Contenders:

    • 2001 Vieux Telegraphe – The 2001 Chateauneuf du Pape La Crau is gorgeous, structured, impressive. Full-bodied and backward, with great depth, purity, and heady aromatics, this 20,000-case blend of 60% Grenache, 15% Mourvedre, 10% Syrah, and 15% miscellaneous amounts of the other permitted varietals will easily rival the 1998. A deep ruby/purple-tinged color is accompanied by a sweet perfume of salty sea breezes, seaweed, melted licorice, kirsch liqueur, creme de cassis, and iodine … a classic Vieux-Telegraphe aromatic display. Powerful as well as firmly structured, this is a wine to lay away for 4-5 years. It should prove to be uncommonly long-lived, lasting a minimum of two decades. It gets my nod as the greatest Vieux-Telegraphe since the 1998. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.
    • 2001 Vieux Donjon – One of the appellation’s classic, old style offerings, the Michel family continues to produce an uncompromisingly long-lived, remarkably consistent Chateauneuf du Pape. The dark plum/purple-colored 2001 boasts a huge, Provencal-styled bouquet of ground pepper, lavender, roasted herbes de Provence, beef blood, and cranberry as well as black cherry liqueur. This perfumed effort exhibits sweet, broad, full-bodied flavors, moderately high tannin, and admirable density and chewiness. There are also hints of underbrush, new saddle leather, incense, and black fruits. This striking 2001 needs 1-3 years of cellaring. It will drink well for 12-15 years. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.
    • 2001 Domaine du Pegau Cuvée Réservée – The 2001 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee Reservee is a prodigious effort. The dark plum/ruby/garnet color is followed by a spectacular smorgasbord of aromas, including roasted meats, lavender, ground pepper, and thick, sweet blackberry and brandy-macerated cherries. Full-bodied, dense, and chewy, it has high levels of tannin, a huge finish, and a monster upside. Although less voluptuous than the 2000, the 2001 looks to be potentially the longest-lived and finest Cuvee Reservee since the wonderful duo of 1989 and 1990, both of which are aging splendidly. Anticipated maturity: 2006-2020. 95 points fom the Wine Advocate.

Which 2001 Châteauneuf-du-Pape should I open?

  • 2001 Domaine du Pegau Cuvée Réservée (43%, 16 Votes)
  • 2001 Vieux Telegraphe (30%, 11 Votes)
  • 2001 Vieux Donjon (27%, 10 Votes)

Total Voters: 37

Loading ... Loading ...

Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the August installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

1999 Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Bottle Notes

Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the Rhone Valley, was founded in 1898 by Hippolyte Brunier. Located on the highest terrace of the appellation, the domaine was named for an 18th century telegraph relay tower located nearby. Today the 173-acre domaine is run by Daniel and Frederic Brunier, the great grandsons of the founder. Vieux Télégraphe is one of the appellation’s most admired estates. The vineyards are planted to 65% Grenache, 15% Syrah, 15% Mourvedre and 5% Cinsault and other grapes.

Light red in color and throwing a touch of sediment. 14% ABV. Red fruits, kirsch and anise on the nose. Light body and medium acidity. Old school Chateauneuf flavors of iron, iodine, plums, garrigue and herbes de Provence. Lots of grip on a medium length finish. Drink over the next year or two. Super showing for VT from an average vintage in CdP.

My rating: 92 points.

I previously wrote about Vieux Télégraphe in 2010 Châteauneuf-du-Pape: My Recommendations. The ’11 version of this wine is spectacular and still available at retail for about $60 per bottle. Happy hunting!

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email

2003 Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Bottle Notes

Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the Rhone Valley, was founded in 1898 by Hippolyte Brunier. Located on the highest terrace of the appellation, the domaine was named for an 18th century telegraph relay tower located nearby. Today the 173-acre domaine is run by Daniel and Frederic Brunier, the great grandsons of the founder. Vieux Télégraphe is one of the appellation’s most admired estates. The vineyards are planted to 65% Grenache, 15% Syrah, 15% Mourvedre and 5% Cinsault and other grapes.

Light red in color with some definite bricking on the edge. 14.5% ABV. I immediately noticed that the wine does not have any of the prune, raisin characteristics often associated with ’03 CdP’s. It did though show just a touch of heat. Heady aromas of red fruits, garrigue and framboise. Plum, kirsch, raspberry, roasted herbs and orange peel on the palate. Medium body, light acidity and dusty tannins on the finish. This wine completely exceeded my expectations. Drink over the next 3-5 years.

My rating: 93 points.

I previously wrote about Vieux Télégraphe in 2010 Châteauneuf-du-Pape: My Recommendations. The ’11 version of this wine is spectacular and still available at retail. Happy hunting!

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via email