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Posts tagged ‘Pahlmeyer’

New Releases from Wayfarer Vineyard

Wayfarer Vineyard, located on the remote Sonoma Coast, was planted by David Abreu in 2002. In 2005, Jayson Pahlymeyer started blending Wayfarer Pinot Noir and Chardonnay with fruit from Russian River Vineyards and bottling it under the Pahlmeyer label. By 2012, the vineyard’s exceptional fruit presented an irrefutable case for a namesake label. Jayson’s daughter, Cleo Pahlmeyer, runs the estate and Bibiana González Rave is in charge of winemaking.

I was fortunate to try some of the wineries new releases.

2014 Wayfarer Chardonnay – Bright gold in color. 14.5% ABV. Sublime nose of Meyer lemons, hazelnuts and brioche. Rich and creamy with perfect acidity. Flavors of honeysuckle, peach and apple with just a touch of minerality. The finish is crisp and lingers on the palate. Absolutely stunning Chardonnay. Drink over the next 4-6 years. $80 at the winery. My rating: 95 points.

2014 Wayfarer Pinot Noir – Bright red in color. 14.5% ABV. Gorgeous nose of red fruits, pine needle, baking spice and forest floor. Smooth as silk on the palate with mouth watering acidity. Flamboyant and fruit forward flavors of cherry, strawberry and cranberry. The finish is exceptionally long. A big, bold Pinot Noir with enough nuance and complexity to make things really compelling. Fantastic wine. Drink over the next 5-7 years. $90 at the winery. My rating: 94 points.

There is much to like here. Great people, exceptional wines and an impeccable vineyard. I’ll be looking to add future vintages of Wayfarer to my wine cellar.

Reviews based on samples provided by the winery.

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Pick My Next Bottle – A Wine for Thanksgiving

The November installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on some special bottles that might grace the table at Zinfandel Chronicles Headquarters this Thanksgiving. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. I plan on opening the winning bottle on Thanksgiving and will publish a Bottle Note shortly thereafter.

As it pertains to vintages, 1998 for Châteauneuf-du-Pape, 1997 for Napa Valley and 1990 for Bordeaux, are without question some of the all time greats.

The contenders:

  • 1998 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe “La Crau” Châteauneuf-du-Pape – Between 1978 and 2007, this 1998 is the greatest Vieux Telegraphe that was produced. It has taken a good decade for this wine to shed its tannins and come out of a dormant, closed period. It has finally emerged, and notes of iodine, seaweed, black currants, incense, and sweet cherries as well as hot rocks jump from the glass of this full-bodied, powerful wine. It possesses considerable elegance and purity, along with loads of raspberries and incense, in a round, juicy, rich style that is just emerging from the closet. The wine is still youthful and a pre-adolescent in terms of its ultimate evolution. Approachable now, it will continue to evolve for another 15-20 years. Bravo! 95 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 1997 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red – The finest Proprietary Red produced by Pahlmeyer to date is their 1997… A super-rich, blockbuster effort, it exhibits an opaque purple color in addition to a fabulous bouquet of black fruits, espresso, cocoa, mocha, and flowers. A prodigious red, with low acidity, spectacular concentration, and fabulous purity as well as overall symmetry, it can be drunk now, but promises to last for 20-25 years. 98 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 1990 Leoville Barton – Believe it or not, the 1990 Leoville Barton can actually be drunk – something that cannot be said about the broodingly backward, still excruciatingly tannic 1982. The exceptionally concentrated 1990 reveals more polished, sweeter tannins along with a big, sweet kiss of black currant, forest floor, cedar, and spice box notes. While it still has some tannins to shed, this full-bodied, powerful, long wine is approachable. It should continue to evolve for another two decades. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which Bottle Should I open for Thanksgiving

  • 1998 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe (42%, 23 Votes)
  • 1997 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red (35%, 19 Votes)
  • 1990 Leoville Barton (23%, 13 Votes)

Total Voters: 55

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Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the December installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

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Pick My Next Bottle – 2002 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon

The May installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon from the the 2002 vintage. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. The winning bottle will be opened on Saturday and a Bottle Note will be published the following week.

By all accounts 2002 was an exceptional vintage for Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. Following on the heels of the flashy 2001 vintage, a long dry Summer with some September heat spikes, led to an earlier than normal harvest. The top wines of the vintage are aging gloriously and will cruise to fifteen years of age assuming ideal storage conditions.

The Contenders

  • 2002 Araujo Eisele Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon – Araujo’s spectacular 2002 Cabernet Sauvignon Eisele Vineyard is a 1,700-case blend of 96% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Cabernet Franc and 1% Petit Verdot from a vineyard tucked in the lower hillsides of northeastern Napa Valley, not far from the quaint town of Calistoga. Araujo has enjoyed an incredible string of top-notch vintages from 2001 through 2005 and again from 2008 through 2010. Extremely youthful at age ten, the 2002 is a candidate for perfection. Its dense blue/purple hue is followed by abundant aromas of cassis, incense, crushed rocks and spring flowers. Full-bodied and opulent as well as pure, rich and authoritative, with abundant but beautifully integrated tannins, this opulent, plush 2002 can be drunk now or cellared for another 20-25 years. 99 points from the Wine Advocate.
  • 2002 Dalle Valla Cabernet Sauvignon – The sensational 2002 Cabernet Sauvignon is a blend of 90% Cabernet Sauvignon and 10% Cabernet Franc from the red soils of their vineyards planted in the Oakville Corridor on the eastern hillsides overlooking the valley floor vineyards of Screaming Eagle and Rudd Estate. A dense ruby/purple color is followed by aromas and flavors reminiscent of a 4-to-5 year-old wine rather than one that has already hit a decade of age. In fact, it probably needs another 5-10 years of cellaring and should keep for 20-25 more years. It is another example of what will one day be regarded as the ‘golden age’ of Napa Valley for the progress in quality and the world class wines that were produced. A wine of great stature and majesty, the youthful 2002 exhibits sweet licorice, creme de cassis, incense and graphite aromas, and is bursting with potential. 97 points from Wine Advocate.
  • 2002 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red – The nearly perfect 2002 Proprietary Red Wine is a blend of 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot and the rest dollops of Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec. This exotic, full-throttle, nearly over-the-top red wine’s intensity, richness and smoky coffee notes intermixed with notions of chocolate, graphite, and jammy blackberry and black currant fruit ooze from the glass. This rich, concentrated beauty tastes more like a top-notch, young Right Bank Bordeaux from a vintage such as 2009 than a wine dominated by Cabernet Sauvignon. With stunning purity and awesome potential, it can be drunk now or cellared for another two decades.
    99 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which 2002 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon should I open?

  • Araujo Eisele Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon (49%, 19 Votes)
  • Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red (31%, 12 Votes)
  • Dalla Valle Cabernet Sauvignon (20%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 39

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Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another.

Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the June Installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

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2004 Pahlmeyer Merlot – Bottle Notes

Pahlmeyer was founded in the mid-1980s when Jayson Pahlmeyer, a Bay Area lawyer, decided he preferred thinking about wine over reading legal briefs. Pahlmeyer produced its debut vintage in 1986. The winemaking team is comprised of Kale Anderson who is Director of Winemaking for the Napa Valley vineyard and operations, and Bibiana González Rave as Consulting Winemaker overseeing the Sonoma Coast vineyard and operations.

This bottle was opened the evening of the American Canyon earthquake. The devestation in the Napa Valley is truly heartbreaking. Show your support for Napa Valley by opening a bottle from your favorite producer.

Dark crimson in color. 15.2% ABV. Incredible nose of red and blue fruits, cocoa powder and baking spices. Great mouthfeel. Almost like liquid silk. The palate has flavors of currants, cassis, chocolate truffle and blueberries. The finish is long and silky. Hitting its stride at 10 years of age but probably best over the next 2-3 years. Fantastic showing from one of the best Merlot producers in California.

My rating: 95 points.

Pahlmeyer wines are readily available at retail and via the winery. The 2011 Pahlmeyer Merlot should set you back about $75. I’ll be looking for a few bottles.

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Pick My Next Bottle – 2001 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon

The June Installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on 2001 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. Voting will close this Saturday and the winning bottle will be opened this Sunday. A Bottle Note will be published shortly thereafter.

2001 was simply a great vintage for Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. The Summer of 2001 was somewhat cool with temperatures rarely exceeding 85 degrees. This led to wines with somewhat higher acidity that have aged absolutely gloriously. The vintage has been compared to other Napa classics like 1974 and 1991.

The Contenders:

    • 2001 Pahlmeyer – More primary and backward, the 2001 Cabernet Sauvignon needs 4-6 more years of cellaring, but is capable of lasting three decades or more. Composed of 80% Cabernet Sauvignon, 14% Merlot and the rest Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and a dollop of Malbec, it exhibits a dense, thick, black/purple color as well as emerging aromas of cedar, black currants, ink, graphite, charcoal and forest floor. This full-bodied, packed and stacked Cabernet offers a sexy, open-knit opulence on the attack followed by noticeable tannins. However, the latter component is clearly balanced by the wine’s stunning concentration, texture and overall depth. As stated above, forget this beauty for another 4-6 years and drink it over the following 25-30. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.
    • 2001 Spottswoode – This is a beautiful wine, although more recent vintages may ultimately prove to be even better, particularly the 2007. This blend of 95% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Cabernet Franc, from one of Napa’s prestigious sites on the valley floor tucked behind the town of St. Helena, has a dense blue/purple color and a beautifully sweet nose of spring flowers intermixed with raspberry jam, blueberries and black currants. Some licorice and subtle oak are followed by a quintessentially elegant yet substantial wine with sweet tannins, medium to full body and a seamless texture. Drinkable already, the wine will continue to offer the more elegant, complex, evolved style of Napa Cabernet Sauvignon produced in 2001 for at least another 15-20 years. 95 points from the Wine Advocate.
    • 2001 Plumpjack – A more long distance runner, although approachable now, the 2001 Cabernet Sauvignon Estate exhibits a similar dense plum/purple color in addition to notes of white flowers, black raspberries, black currants, lead pencil shavings and burning embers. Full-bodied and rich with low acidity, sweet tannin and a corpulent, nicely textured, long mouthfeel, it should hit its prime in 2-3 years, and last for 2+ decades. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which 2001 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon should I open?

  • 2001 Spottswoode (43%, 25 Votes)
  • 2001 Plumpjack (29%, 17 Votes)
  • 2001 Pahlmeyer (28%, 16 Votes)

Total Voters: 58

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Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the July installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

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In Defense of Merlot

It’s become fashionable to bash Merlot.

Will Lyons of the Wall Street Journal wrote: “What struck me was how different the vintages were in style, how poorly some of the Merlots showed and just how stunning the Cabernet Sauvignons were.”

From Tim Fish of The Wine Spectator: “The 2010 California Merlots just aren’t much fun to taste. Another tough day in the tasting room.”

I get it. There is an ocean of mediocre Merlot, not only in California, but also in Washington. Fellow wine blogger Cliff Brown  sums up the biggest issue with Merlot: “There are simply very few, if any, Merlots in the $20-$30 price point that are worthy of your attention.”

What’s lost in the bashing is the fact that there are some simply breathtaking Merlots being made in both Washington and California.

To prove my point, here are recent tasting notes from some of my favorite Merlot producers including Leonetti, Switchback Ridge and Force Majeure.

  • 2004 Leonetti Merlot – Crimson in color. 14.1% ABV. 97% Merlot and 3% Cabernet Sauvignon. The fruit is sourced from Canoe Ridge Estate, Sagemoor Farms and Wallula Vineyards. Black fruits, pencil shavings and vanilla on the nose. Cherry liqueur, cassis, spice, anise, leather and chocolate on the palate. Exceptionally long finish. Fine grained tannins. Drink over the next 2-4 years. My rating: 93 points.
  • 2007 Grand Reve/Force Majeure Collaboration Seriers IV – The wine is a gorgeous ruby red in color. Heady aromas of cherries, pencil and cedar. Blackberries, blueberries, cherry liqueur, currants, anise, graham cracker and leather on the palate. Sexy and hedonistic with lush, silky tannins. The wine has great mouthfeel and texture. Drink over the next 5-7 years. My rating: 94 points.
  • 2006 Switchback Ridge Merlot – Dark, brooding and jammy. Layers of raspberries, cassis, cedar, chocolate, spice and currants on the palate. Just a hint of toasty oak rounds things out. The wine is lush with rich, creamy, hedonistic fruit. The finish is exceptionally long and sweet. Enjoy this wine over the next 3-5 years. My rating: 92 points.

Other Merlot producers making exceptional wines include Pahlmeyer, Pride, Blackbird, Paloma, Blankiet and Robert Foley. Unfortunatly, to Cliff’s point, most of these Merlots cost upwards of $50. Nonetheless, don’t give up on the varietal just yet!

What are some of your favorite high end or value Merlots?

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1995 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red – Bottle Notes

The 1995 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red was the winning bottle of the June installment of Pick My Next Bottle. The wine was decanted for 30 minutes and served with grilled flank steak.

Pahlmeyer was founded in the mid-1980s when Jayson Pahlmeyer, a Bay Area lawyer, decided he preferred thinking about wine over reading legal briefs. Pahlmeyer produced its debut vintage in 1986. The winemaking team is comprised of Kale Anderson who is Director of Winemaking for the Napa Valley vineyard and operations, and Bibiana González Rave as Consulting Winemaker overseeing the Sonoma Coast vineyard and operations.

Crimson in color with a hint of bricking on the edges. 79% Cabernet Sauvignon, 9% Cabernet Franc, 5% Merlot , 4% Malbec and 3% Petit Verdot. 14.1% ABV. Black fruits, leather and a healthy dose of mint on the nose. Currants, cassis, chocolate, eucalyptus, tobacco, spice, cherries and plums on the palate. Layers upon layers of gorgeous Cabernet fruit. Great extraction. Lush and sexy. This wine is absolutely great right now. I’d be inclined to drink over the next year or so.

My rating: 96 points.

The wines made by Helen Turley at Pahlmeyer from ’95-’97 are truly monumental. I am not a big advocate of buying wines this old at auction, but… if you are sure of the provenance of bottles from these years, then they are worthy of your attention. The 2009 version of this wine is available via the winery website.

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Pick My Next Bottle – Cabernet Sauvignon Showdown

The June installment of Pick My Next Bottle focuses on Cabernet Sauvignon from some of the best regions in the world known for growing this noble grape. As I mentioned in the first installment, the purpose of this series is to provide insight into specific wines or producers you may currently have in your cellar. I will open the winning bottle on June 29th and publish a Bottle Note in early July.

The Producers

  • Quilceda Creek Vintners was founded in 1978 by Alex and Jeanette Golitzin. Alex Golitzin is a nephew of André Tchelistcheff, the legendary winemaker who put Beaulieu Vineyard at the forefront of Napa Valley Cabernet in the 1960s and 70s. He credits summer trips to visit his uncle in St. Helena, California with developing his early interest in wine. Alex’s son, Paul Golitzin is now chief winemaker at the winery.
  • Pahlmeyer was founded in the mid-1980s when Jayson Pahlmeyer, a Bay Area lawyer, decided he preferred thinking about wine over reading legal briefs. Pahlmeyer produced its debut vintage in 1986. The winemaking team is comprised of Kale Anderson who is Director of Winemaking for the Napa Valley vineyard and operations, and Bibiana González Rave as Consulting Winemaker overseeing the Sonoma Coast vineyard and operations.
  • Chateau Leoville Poyferre, in St.-Julien-Beychevelle, is a Second Growth Bordeaux according to the 1855 Bordeaux classification. Along with Leoville-Las-Cases and Leoville-Barton, Leoville Poyferre was part of a large estate in the Medoc originally owned by the Marquis de Leoville. After the French revolution the estate was divided and sold at public auction, where the portion that is now Chateau Leoville Poyferre was bought by Monsieur Poyferre. Today the estate is owned and run by Didier Cuvelier and his family and the quality of the wines has soared with modernization of the cellars and other improvements.

The Contenders

1994 Quilceda Creek – It offers deep and compelling aromas of red and black fruits, lead pencil, and traces of oak spices. This full-bodied, concentrated, and chewy wine is thick, dense, and gorgeously defined for such a massive wine. Its combination of power and elegance brought to mind the 1986 Margaux, one of the finest wines ever produced by that illustrious estate… This is a truly magnificent wine, and it will age remarkably well. Drink it between 2004 and 2015. 94 points from the Wine Advocate.

1995 Pahlmeyer – The 1995 Proprietary Red Wine may be even better than the 96 point score I bestowed it. It is unquestionably among the top dozen 1995s. The wine boasts an explosive blackberry/blueberry/cassis-scented nose that has completely soaked up all the new oak in which it has been aged for the last 22 months. Purple/black in color, it exhibits fabulously extracted, layered black fruit flavors that coat the palate, offering a seamless texture and voluptuous impression. 96 points from the Wine Advocate.

1996 Leoville Poyferre – This fabulous 1996 was tasted three times from bottle, and it is unquestionably the estate’s finest wine since their blockbuster 1990. Medium to full-bodied, with a saturated black/purple color, the nose offers notes of cedar, jammy black fruits, smoke, truffles, and subtle new oak. In the mouth, there is impressive fruit extraction, a tannic, full-bodied structure, and a classic display of power and finesse. The longer it sat in the glass, the more impressive the wine became. Backward, and massive in terms of its extract and richness, this should prove to be a sensational Leoville-Poyferre for drinking over the next three decades. 93 points from the Wine Advocate.

Which Cabernet Sauvignon should I open?

  • 1995 Pahlmeyer (40%, 21 Votes)
  • 1994 Quilceda Creek (34%, 18 Votes)
  • 1996 Leoville Poyferre (26%, 14 Votes)

Total Voters: 53

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Thanks for voting! I’d love to see a comment below on why you picked one bottle over another. Also, let me know if you have any suggestions for the July installment of Pick My Next Bottle.

If you enjoyed this post please consider subscribing to Zinfandel Chronicles updates by email.

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2004 Pahlmeyer Chardonnay Sonoma Coast – Bottle Notes

Pahlmeyer was founded in the mid-1980s when Jayson Pahlmeyer, a Bay Area lawyer, decided he preferred thinking about wine over reading legal briefs. Pahlmeyer produced its debut vintage in 1986.

The wines are crafted from fruit grown on the family’s Waters Ranch Vineyard high above Napa Valley, Wayfarer Vineyard on the Sonoma Coast as well as purchased fruit from well established vineyards. The winemaking team is comprised of Kale Anderson who is Director of Winemaking for the Napa Valley vineyard and operations, and Bibiana González Rave as Consulting Winemaker overseeing the Sonoma Coast vineyard and operations.

The fruit for the 2004 Sonoma Coast Chardonnay was sourced from Ritchie Vineyard which is also a fruit source for Aubert. The wine is lightly straw colored. The nose is subdued with aromas of apples, marshmallow, tropical fruits and vanilla. Brioche, butterscotch, pineapple, citrus and more apple on the palate. Rich, oily and delicious with just the right amount of acidity. The finish is long, fresh and a little bit tart.

My rating: 92 points.

The 2010 version of this wine is available online through the winery and should be fairly easy to find at retail, too.

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Mailing Lists: Excellent California Wine Without The Wait

My brother started buying and cellaring wine a decade after I did and has since amassed about 800 bottles of mostly California wine. He recently lamented that his collection was deep in Pinot Noir but lacking in Cabernet Sauvignon. He was wondering which Napa Cabs I suggest he look into.

This got me to thinking: Many of the wines you hear so much about have long waiting lists, including Schrader, Maybach and Scarecrow. It never hurts to put your name on the list, but what should you do in the meantime to stock your cellar with varietals you’re passionate about?

I gave my brother the name of several California wineries that made classic Cabernet Sauvignon and did not have a wait for their mailing lists. Here are those and a few more to check out if you’re new to the hobby or want to build up a particular varietal:

Cabernet Sauvignon

  • Spottswoode – Spottswoode was founded in 1972 by Jack and Mary Novak in St. Helena. Year over year, Spottswoode competes with the very best from both Napa and Bordeaux. The wine is not cheap at $145 a bottle, but this is one to splurge on.
  • Pahlmeyer – Pahlmeyer was founded in 1986 by Jason Pahlmeyer. While the Proprietary Red is a Bordeaux blend, not a Cabernet, it is another wine that delivers without fail. The wine runs $115 from the winery.
  • Black Sears – For years Black Sears sold fruit to some of the finest wineries in Napa. They also produce an Estate Cabernet made by Thomas Rivers-Brown. You are looking at $80 for the most recent vintage.

Pinot Noir

  • Navarro – Located in the Anderson Vally, Navarro, has been producing exceptional, fairly-priced wines since 1974. The Deep End Blend Pinot Noir is their very best and will only set you back $38.
  • Black Kite – Black Kite is a family-run winery in Anderson Valley, specializing in block designated Pinot Noir from the Kite’s Rest Vineyard. A great lineup starting at $42 per bottle.
  • Peay – The winery is in the Northwest corner of Sonoma County, just a few miles from the coast. A lineup of classic Sonoma Coast Pinot’s starting at $45 per bottle.

Zinfandel

  • Ridge – I think Ridge is often overlooked in a Zinfandel world where Carlisle and Turley get all the press, but their history goes back almost 50 years. Exceptional single vineyard Zins starting at $35.
  • Brown – The Brown family acquired land in the hills east of Rutherford in 1980 and started their own label in 1995. The flagship Napa Zinfandel runs $40 per bottle.
  • Black Sears – As mentioned above, Black Sears does a stellar Cabernet but they are better known for their Zinfandel (the vineyard was at one time a fruit source for Turley). The current vintage will be released this fall and should price around $45 per bottle.

I’ve been a fan of these wineries for years, and am pleased to have them in my cellar. You should be able to buy directly from all of them without a wait to get on the mailing list.

What California wineries would you recommend for us patiently awaiting mailing list spots?

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